Winter Olympics live stream: how to watch Beijing 2022 online for free, schedule, events calendar

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Winter Olympics live stream: how to watch Beijing 2022 online for free, schedule, events calendar
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The coolest show on Earth, the Winter Olympics, gets underway next month. Beijing 2022 is set to be the sporting equivalent of the most high-octane variety show you’ve ever seen, complete with intricate contraptions, madcap aerobatics and displays of bravery so wildly ill-advised they make the summer games look bashful. Read on and we’ll show you the best ways to watch the Winter Olympics 2022 wherever you are in the world.

Bobsleigh, skeleton, luge and ski jumping are the kinds of events you probably only follow once every four years, but when they’re on TV there’s nothing else you’d rather be doing. Blink and you’ll miss them though, with only a handful of events on the Beijing 2022 program. 

Curling, figure skating and ice hockey, meanwhile, are some of the slower burners, with the action eclipsing the Games in some instances. They’re probably the most accessible Winter Olympics sports too, no matter what sort of climate you live in. Follow the right storyline and you might just be inspired to strap on a pair of blades or pick up a broom yourself. 

Whatever your favourite snow sport, you can find out exactly when it’s on in our Beijing 2022 schedule below with a day-by-day breakdown of the Winter Olympics events calendar.

It’s the biggest Winter Olympics ever for 2022. There are 109 medal events set to be contested across 15 disciplines and seven sports, and whichever country or athlete you follow, the good news is that it’s easy to get a FREE Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics live stream – just follow our guide to watch the Games online and from anywhere.


How to live stream Winter Olympics 2022 from outside your country

Without wishing to state the obvious, the Winter Olympics is a global event, and there should be a way to watch no matter where you find yourself during the gold-frenzy fortnight. But if you are abroad and struggling to see it – or if you just want the comfort and language of your home nation’s coverage – then geo-restrictons may stand in your way of getting a Beijing 2022 live stream.

But there’s a really easy way around that problem. By downloading and installing a VPN, you can effectively trick your computer into thinking that it’s back at home. That way you can enjoy your home coverage without having to find an illegal stream – assuming you comply with the broadcaster’s fine print, of course.

Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics events calendar by day

(All times ET. Add 5 hours for GMT; add 16 hours for AEDT; subtract 3 hours for PT.)

Wednesday, February 2

7.05am – Curling

11.10pm – Ice Hockey

Thursday, February 3

5am – Freestyle Skiing

8.05pm – Curling

9.02pm – Figure Skating

11.10pm – Ice Hockey

Friday, February 4

7am – Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony

8pm – Curling

9.45pm – Snowboarding

11.10pm – Ice Hockey

Saturday, February 5

12.15am – Ski Jumping

12.45am – Cross-Country Skiing

2am – Biathlon

3.30am – Speed Skating

5am – Freestyle Skiing

6am – Short Track Speed Skating

6.10am – Luge

8.05pm – Curling

8.30pm – Figure Skating

8.30pm – Snowboarding

10pm – Alpine Skiing

Sunday, February 6

12am – Cross-Country Skiing

3.30am – Speed Skating

3.40am – Ice Hockey

5am – Freestyle Skiing

5am – Ski Jumping

6.30am – Luge

8.05pm – Curling

8.22pm – Figure Skating

8.30pm – Freestyle Skiing

9.15pm – Alpine Skiing

11pm – Snowboarding

11.10pm – Ice Hockey

Monday, February 7

3.30am – Speed Skating

4am – Biathlon

4.30am – Short Track Speed Skating

5.28am – Ski Jumping

6.50am – Luge

8.22pm – Figure Skating

9pm – Freestyle Skiing

9.40pm – Snowboarding

10pm – Alpine Skiing

11.10pm – Ice Hockey

Tuesday, February 8

1.05am – Curling

5am – Cross-Country Skiing

5.30am – Biathlon

5.30am – Speed Skating

6.50am – Luge

8.30pm – Snowboarding

9.15pm – Alpine Skiing

10pm – Freestyle Skiing

Wednesday, February 9

2am – Nordic Combined

3.40am – Ice Hockey

6am – Short Track Speed Skating

7.05am – Curling

9.20am – Luge

8.05pm – Curling

8.30pm – Snowboarding

8.30pm – Skeleton

8.38pm – Figure Skating

9.30pm – Alpine Skiing

11.10pm – Ice Hockey

Thursday, February 10

12am – Cross-Country Skiing

6am – Freestyle Skiing

8.30am – Luge

9am – Speed Skating

8.05pm – Curling

8.30pm – Snowboarding

8.30pm – Skeleton

10pm – Alpine Skiing

11.10pm – Ice Hockey

Friday, February 11

12am – Cross-Country Skiing

3am – Speed Skating

4am – Biathlon

4.45am – Ski Jumping

6am – Short Track Speed Skating

8.05pm – Curling

9pm – Snowboarding

11.10pm – Ice Hockey

Saturday, February 12

2.30am – Cross-Country Skiing 

3am – Speed Skating

4am – Biathlon

5am – Ski Jumping

6.07am – Figure Skating

7.20am – Skeleton

8.05pm – Curling

8.30pm – Bobsleigh

9pm – Freestyle Skiing

9.15pm – Alpine Skiing

11.10pm – Ice Hockey

Sunday, February 13

2am – Cross-Country Skiing

4am – Biathlon

6am – Short Track Speed Skating

8am – Speed Skating

8.05pm – Curling

8.22pm – Figure Skating

8.30pm – Bobsleigh

8.30pm – Freestyle Skiing

8.30pm – Snowboarding

11.10pm – Ice Hockey

Monday, February 14

5.10am – Ski Jumping

8.05pm – Curling

8.30pm – Freestyle Skiing

8.30pm – Snowboarding

10pm – Alpine Skiing

11.10pm – Ice Hockey

Tuesday, February 15

1.30am – Speed Skating

2am – Nordic Combined

4am – Biathlon

5.08am – Figure Skating

9.15am – Bobsleigh

8.05pm – Curling

9.15pm – Alpine Skiing

11.10pm – Ice Hockey

Wednesday, February 16

2.45am – Biathlon

4am – Cross-Country Skiing

6am – Freestyle Skiing

6.30am – Short Track Speed Skating

8.05pm – Curling

8.30pm – Freestyle Skiing

9.30pm – Alpine Skiing

11.10pm – Ice Hockey

Thursday, February 17

2am – Nordic Combined

3.30am – Speed Skating

5.08am – Figure Skating

8.30pm – Freestyle Skiing

11.10pm – Ice Hockey

Friday, February 18

1.05am – Curling

3.30am – Speed Skating

4am – Biathlon

5.38am – Figure Skating

9am – Bobsleigh

8.30pm – Bobsleigh

8.30pm – Freestyle Skiing

10pm – Alpine Skiing

Saturday, February 19

1am – Cross-Country Skiing

1.05am – Curling

2am – Speed Skating

4am – Biathlon

6.08am – Figure Skating

8.10am – Ice Hockey

8.05pm – Curling

8.30pm – Bobsleigh

11pm – Figure Skating

11.10pm – Ice Hockey

Sunday, February 20

1.30am – Cross-Country Skiing

7am – Winter Olympics Closing Ceremony (exact start time TBC)

Are there any new sports for 2022 Winter Olympics?

No new sports have been added to the Winter Olympics program, but there are seven new events to look forward to: 

  • Men’s and women’s Big Air Freestyle Skiing 
  • Women’s Monobob Bobsleigh
  • Mixed team Aerials Freestyle Skiing
  • Mixed team Ski Jumping
  • Mixed team Snowboard Cross
  • Mixed team Short Track Speed Skating

Where are the 2022 Winter Olympics being held?

Beijing is playing host to the Winter Olympics for the first time. In fact, this is the first time that the Winter Games have come to China at all, which has seen close neighbors Japan and South Korea host the event in previous years.

And here’s another first: Beijing is the first city in the world to host both the Summer Olympics and the Winter Olympics.

Both the Opening Ceremony and the Closing Ceremony will be held at the iconic Bird’s Nest Stadium – officially the Beijing National Stadium – and there are three Winter Olympics Villages, in the hub of Beijing, in Yanqing in the outskirts of the capital, and in neighboring Zhangjiakou.

When are the 2022 Winter Paralympics?

The 2022 Winter Paralympics begin shortly after the end of the Winter Olympics. The event is scheduled to start on Friday, March 4, and will run for just over a week, coming to an end on March 13. 

Will there be domestic spectators at the Winter Olympics?

With Covid-19 rearing its head once again through the rapid spread of the Omicron variant, any decision on whether to allow spectators to attend the Games is yet to be made by China, which has a “Zero Covid” strategy aimed at halting all transmissions of the virus.

There have been reports suggesting that if fans were to be allowed to attend, they’ll be told to clap instead of cheer, which would itself make for a rather eerie atmosphere, more akin to a night at the opera than elite sport.

Every decision made about Beijing 2022 will be done with considerable amounts of scrutiny as the global health crisis continues to dictate large scale events and the drawing in of large crowds. 

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